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A Pathway into the archive: with Denis Grant King

[Editor’s note: Matt completed a student placement with the Avebury Papers as part of his masters’ programme at University of York. The team are so happy to publish one of the key outcomes of the placement here. You can more about his experience in his first blog post. Huge thanks to our volunteers who participated in the Focus Group and whose feedback will directly impact future development of Pathways. A link to Matt’s Pathway may be found at the bottom of this post]

Introduction: A Pathway into the Avebury Papers

The Avebury Papers archive houses thousands of digital items that cover the range of occupation of Avebury, as well as the history of the Avebury excavation. One of my roles as a placement student was to create a Pathway which would serve as an engaging and entertaining entry into the archive for those not familiar with Avebury and its past. In the creation of this pathway I hoped to create a concise, interesting, and accessible entryway into the Avebury Papers for those that are interested in the history of the Avebury excavation. 

Denis Grant King in the drawing office at Avebury, Accession Number 20000606.

The photographs that I chose directly correlate to diary entries from Denis Grant King, who was an archaeological draughtsman working at the 1930s excavations, and the Pathway aims to tell a human story of adventure. By making these stylistic choices, both textually and through artefacts, ultimately showing one man’s trip to Avebury – from the moment he leaves home to the moment he leaves – not only gives insight into the work and life at Avebury in the 1930s, but also parallels the adventure a tourist may experience today.  

The pathway was created as a ‘Prezi’ experience because Prezi offers an engaging user-experience with a variety of design choices for the author to choose from. Moreover it allows for a free-scrolling form of exploration if the user prefers to explore at their own pace, or follow the more structured slide-show. 

I invited volunteers from the National Trust Avebury team to attend a focus group to give feedback on the Pathway. I ran the focus group when the Prezi was in a ‘beta’ form, ready to use but with the expectation of changes. The focus group was intended to discuss how effectively the Pathway facilitates a user’s further exploration into the Avebury Papers archive. By organising a focus group of self-selecting Avebury Papers volunteers, we were able to benefit from the knowledge of individuals who have intimate knowledge of the archives, and who are also experienced in speaking with visitors to the site.

Focus Group: Guiding Questions

Using the knowledge of Avebury Papers volunteers, I hoped to elucidate how effectively the pathway functioned. Using guiding questions, the focus group aims were to discern whether the pathway should be narrowed down and focus on particular themes in the archive; broadened to include more themes; whether more pathways should be created separate from one another; whether the pathway should function as a storytelling tool or be strictly informative; and ultimately if the pathway was deemed engaging and entertaining. 

These aims were important to explore as they encompass the overall ideas of how one might explore the archive, and be motivated to explore it further. In order to explore these aims throughout the focus group, a series of guiding questions were created. These questions were: 

1.       What did you find most compelling or interesting about the pathway?

2.       In what way Does the pathway inspire you to learn more?

a.       What is working well, and what could be improved upon in this regard?

b.       Did you find that the pathway kept you engaged, or were you bored by it?

3.       How is the pathway representative of the archive as a whole?

a.       Do you think that it is important that the pathway represents the archive as a whole, or should it be representative of only one group of artefacts?

b.       Would you like to see more groupings of artefacts in this pathway, or fewer?

c. Should the pathway be longer?

4.       Should the pathways act as a creative storytelling tool, or be more strictly informative? Why would one option be more effective than the other, in your opinion?

Each question was posed to explore a certain aspect of the pathway. Question one acted as an easy and thought-provoking exploration of what a volunteer felt when exploring the archive, and gave the focus group leaders a chance to see what worked for the pathway from the beginning. Question two, as well as sub point a and b, explored the idea of ‘inspiration’, and was the most lucrative of the questions that resulted in the most conversation, which will be discussed later in this report. Moreover, it helped elucidate on whether the archive was engaging, keeping the attention of the user. Question three helped shed light on the scope of the pathway and what may work best moving forward regarding how much should be in a single pathway and their functionality; this question was heavily touched upon in question 2 during open discussion with the group. Finally, question four opened the floor to the function and tone of the pathway and how that might alter how a user experiences it. 

Discussion

These questions allowed for a free-flowing discussion on the nature of the pathway and their utility in the larger context of the archive.The volunteers listed are as follows: Dai Davies, volunteer 1; Andrew Snowden, volunteer 2; RP, volunteer 3; Bruce Chinery, volunteer 4; Martin, volunteer 5; Volunteer 6.

 Here, I summarise the responses to each question:

  • Question one: This question helped elucidate what works with the Pathway. There was a consensus amongst the volunteers that the pathway was intriguing and enjoyable, and offered insight into what was held in the archive. All volunteers noted that they enjoyed the adventure-like theme of Denis Grant King and the human touch it gave to the pathway. Dai and Andrew noted that they felt they did not get a good sense of what the archive held as a whole, however. They also noted they’d have liked a way to access other topics at a click of a button – for example, hyperlinks that lead to other objects from the collection.
  • Question two: Andrew noted that they enjoyed the post-it style of writing, but did touch on accessibility in terms of whether the user would be using a phone, PC, tablet, etc and how that may alter how they experience the pathway. Volunteer 6 felt that it was a ‘page turner’, also commenting that they would have liked to be able to branch off into new topics similar to a ‘Wikipedia rabbit hole’. This sentiment was shared by Dai. Andrew made note that the audience should be kept in mind when creating a pathway, and Bruce and RP elaborated further that they do not think the pathway would be valuable to a researcher. In the case of this pathway, the volunteers did not specify what the ideal audience of this Pathway was. 
  • Question 3: There were consistent comments throughout the focus group pertaining to the portion of question 3 discussing whether the pathway should be representative of the archive. A sentiment shared by all volunteers was that the Pathway does not paint the whole picture of the Avebury archive. For example, Andrew noted that Denis Grant King’s arrival to Avebury does not occur until later into the excavation, removing the beginning phases of the excavation. Martin echoed this, agreeing that artefacts that predate Denis Grant King would help add to the Pathway. Dai commented that too many pathways would raise an issue of scope, and questioned how many pathways would be feasible to address the entirety of the archive. Volunteer 6 thought that the pathway was an ideal size, a notion that Dai agreed with, and that a high-level summary at the beginning of the Pathway would have served them well to get a quick idea of what the Pathway would entail. 
  • Question 4: Dai, Martin, and Volunteer 6 agreed that the Pathway should be a storytelling tool for the casual visitor. RP said that the Pathway should be factual and straightforward, but still engaging. Andrew noted that while some want storytelling, others want straightforward writing; all participants also noted earlier that the audience should be kept in mind (e.g. academics vs. tourists), raising the notion that there should be different ‘pathways’ for both casual visitors and academic researchers. Volunteer 6 also suggested that she would have liked to see an image of Denis Grant King, the subject of the Pathway, which volunteers agreed with.

Key Findings and Recommendations

Overall, the Pathway met most of its aims based on the focus group results.  Volunteers generally agreed that the Pathway was engaging and informative, and left them wanting to explore further. The Pathway necessarily paints only a small picture of life at Avebury. With time constraints kept in mind regarding the allotted placement hours, the only changes that will be made to this particular placement will be adding the accession numbers to each photograph (a recommendation from the Project Team), as well as adding in a picture of Denis Grant King to more fully introduce him in the pathway.

Further Pathway recommendations

Volunteers shared ideas that were beyond the scope of this Pathway. This is perhaps indicative of the fact that they are very familiar with the archive as a whole. Their responses clearly indicate that further Pathways are desirable. The following are key recommendations for other Pathways that might be developed in the future:

  • Events such as the onset of World War 2 and its effects on the excavation 
  • The start of investigations of Avebury (before the arrival of Denis Grant King). 

By having multiple pathways based around different stories to be told and themes to be explored, visitors would have access to multiple accessible and easily digestible avenues of information, facilitating more active exploration. Moreover, while keeping scope, accessibility, and website management in mind, including hyperlinks to other related information or pathways would allow for a more seamless exploratory experience.

Explore the Pathway

You may explore the beta version of the Pathway via this link to Prezi: https://prezi.com/p/vavra2zu-8dw/?present=1

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Blog

Exploring Avebury Online: reflections on a placement with the Avebury Papers

Content note: please be aware that this post contains reproductions of black-and-white photographs of medieval human remains excavated and photographed in-situ at Avebury in the 1930s. The blog also contains descriptions of how the individual is thought to have died.

Introduction

I am a current student of Digital Archaeology at the University of York. The subfield of Digital Archaeology is a relatively new phenomenon, including all aspects of archaeological investigation that might include the use of computers or software. Digital archives, 3D modeling, VR, Geographic Information Systems and more are all aspects of what a digital archaeologist may do, but it certainly does not cover the entire spectrum. 

I began my placement with the Avebury Papers project in January 2024, where I have been able to explore what it means to help build and participate in a digital archive. Having worked in some manner of physical archives in the past, it has been an incredible experience to see the difference between the physical and the digital, and how these different experiences and environments necessitate different approaches not only to archiving, but in facilitating the use and exploration of an archive.

During my placement, I was tasked with getting to know the archive by exploring the catalogue in progress and digitised items; selecting items to create a Pathway into the archive for future users; and creating a user guide which explains the transcription process.

Exploring a Digital Archive-in-progress

The Avebury Papers provides a unique opportunity not only to explore the fascinating henge monument, but also the many different strands that make up an archaeological excavation. The archive includes 1930s excavation diaries, by Alexander Keiller, William Young, and Denis Grant King, and all of the bureaucratic documents that go into facilitating excavations. These materials are important facets of knowledge production that are often overlooked when considering an archaeological excavation. Not only do they provide researchers with a framework for further investigations of the site as time goes on – and how a site can be excavated and revisited over the course of one-hundred years – but it showcases a window into the past. It highlights the human experience of the archaeological excavation, rather than showing off the artifacts that we are used to seeing on display in museums or stores.

A screengrab showing a folder in the shared Google Drive. Not an easy way to encounter archival materials!

There are issues with digital archives of course. And there are especially issues for encountering a digital archive which is not finished yet. As part of my placement, I have been accessing the digital photographs of archival materials and spreadsheets of information via a Google Drive, in formats that are far from the finished interface.

There is an inherent disconnect between seeing a tangible item and place in the real life world and viewing a virtual archive through an accession number and a screen. Digital items are looked at largely in a vacuum, in their own ‘window’ on the screen – this is counter to how you might view an artifact in a section of a museum, where it is contextualized with multiple others right next to each other. 

Figure 2 – Loose photographs compiled and annotated by Denis Grant King. Accession number 20000603-026

Take Figure 2 for example. Here we have two photographs documenting the excavation of human remains within Avebury stone circle during 1938. Looking at the hand-written description, it reads: 

“Photograph showing how the barber was trapped by the accidental falling of stone No 16. His pelvis was smashed and his neck broken, while his right foot was wedged beneath the stone.” 

From this photo and the general context of the Avebury Archive, you may guess a few things: that this individual could have been one of the prehistoric denizens of Avebury amidst its construction, and they were killed by the movement of the stone. Encountering only this photo set in the archive will not shed much light on the role this individual played in the story of Avebury. 

However, when you add context with the words of an expert who was part of the excavation team, the image becomes much more clear – as seen with Figure 3, below.

Figure 3: accession number 1732623-001, spread 60.

Figure 3 is an excerpt from the diary of Denis Grant King, with a key passage on the right hand page: 

“Thursday, September 15th 1938.

To the Museum. It now appears that the medieval skeleton found partly crushed under a large megalith in the south west-sector is not that of a tailor, as I had been told, but of a surgeon barber, aged 30 to 35, of the time of Edward I or slightly later. Three silver pennies of Edward I, a pair of scissors with sharp (not angular) points, a probe or lancet, and a buckle were were found with the skeleton. I saw these exhibits laid out on the table in room behind the museum in preparation for exhibition on the morrow. On the site I noticed that the “barber” stone was now standing without any baulks of timber, and the next stone had been re-erected. The base and verticality of this stone were determined this morning ready for fixing with concrete socket.”

Transcription from Denis Grant King’s diary, accession number 1732623-001, spread 60.

When working your way through a digital archive which does not yet have a complete catalogue, you sometimes have to build that context yourself. Archives like the Avebury Papers, that house both the written reports and diaries of the excavation as well as the artifacts and features that were found, provide a great way to pull together a story. To orient myself in the digital archive-in-progress, I started by seeking out images that spoke to me the most – one of these was Figure 1. I save these photos and then read through some of the transcriptions of diaries that accompany the artifacts, specifically looking at similar dates. This is how I was able to build context for myself within the archive.

When the digital archive is finished, users will be able to perform more complicated searches. However, this task can still be laborious, and also is not always an accessible option: after all, a user would have to have a keyword in mind, or already know what they are looking for if their only way into the archive is a search box. Someone that is a casual viewer of an archive, who might not be trained in archaeology or history, may find this process of searching cumbersome. Some users may prefer to have context laid out for them more ‘generously’, rather than having to search for it themselves (Whitelaw, 2015). Therein lies one of the challenges of making an open, exploratory digital archive – and why building a Pathway into the archive is an important task that I was given as a Placement volunteer. 

Creating a Pathway: with Denis Grant King

My main objective during this placement was to prepare a new pathway into the archive: that is, establishing themes and contexts that users might find helpful to follow to make their journey into the archives a more streamlined experience. By building a Pathway into the archive, I was able to do a few different things. One of these is building an engaging and entertaining introduction into one aspect of the archive, giving a user something to get started with research in the archive itself. In this case, I chose materials produced by Denis Grant King, an archaeologist and draftsman for Alexander Keiller, the man running the excavation. Second, this Pathway also allowed me to contextualize various aspects of the archive. The photographs of the barber surgeon excavation and the diary entry I shared above is one example of how I brought together archival objects for the pathway, giving more contextual information and a story for the black and white photographs. 

You can read more about the Pathway that I created, and the feedback generously shared by Avebury National Trust volunteers that helped with its development, in my second blog post [ed note – coming soon!].

User Transcription Notes

I also have been working on user transcription notes. The archive itself has plenty of handwritten diaries – many of which are difficult to read. Transcriptions make the process of exploring them – whether for research or pleasure – much easier. For example, transcriptions allow for the use of the search function on a web page, wherein you can search for key phrases of interest. However in transcribing these texts, decisions must be made on things to change or keep the same.

User notes, then, provide a guideline for archive users to follow that will explain any changes that have been made to the text for legibility’s sake. Eventually, the archive will house user guides of various kinds to help people to understand both how to navigate the archive, but also how the archive in its digital form was created. These guides will hopefully make the archive more accessible, transparent, and open.

Reflecting My Time at Avebury

I have found my time very enriching to my experience as an archaeology student. At first, I found myself floundering (and at times, I still feel that way) with how vast the archive is, and the sometimes oppressive nature of searching through excel spreadsheets and google drives of JPGs. However, as the placement progressed, I have begun to embrace the openness of the archive and find myself happily, and aimlessly, scrolling through areas of interest.

Every day I work in the archives I am met with a new challenge to face. One such challenge is just how truly large it is. It is home to thousands of photographs of actual artifacts, but also landscape photography, feature photography, and photographs of diaries. Because of this, it can be difficult to navigate, especially when contending with filtering between excel sheets listing the accession numbers of artifacts, and the google drive files. It is no easy task to familiarize yourself with the many different accession numbers and associated codes for different artifacts, but it is necessary to do – especially if you hope to find the patterns and themes within the archive to build something like a Pathway as I was asked to do. 

The upside to a challenge such as this, however, is the feeling of triumph after choosing a theme and following it through the archive. And who really minds looking at the rich history that lives within the archive? After many hours of taking note of accession numbers, similar photographs and key words in diaries, certain patterns begin to emerge – which is precisely how my Pathway was born!

It is challenges like this that made the experience at Avebury exactly what I was hoping for: a way to build my skills as a digital archaeologist by teaching me the best ways to navigate an archive, and how to use an archive to bring it to the outside world so others can enjoy it as I have. 

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Blog Pathways and resources

An Avebury Story

By Dushyant Naresh (MSc Digital Archaeology, University of York)

I’ve never really believed in magic, or the supernatural, or a higher power. But I have to admit that there is something undoubtedly magical about Avebury and the prehistoric landscape it is nestled in.

Maybe it’s the size of the stones, or how large the circles are, or the fact that you can walk right up to them and touch them knowing that thousands of years ago, another human being was probably doing the exact same thing, thinking the same thoughts, and feeling this same sense of wonderment. It’s this blurred line between archaeology and emotion that gets the hairs on the back of my neck tingling.

Coincidentally, one core exercise of The Avebury Papers project is to translate some of these emotions into another medium – a “creative intervention” – be it poetry, prose, or something else. I guess you’d call that “art”.

I am the worst artist of all time.

However, I know how to make videos, and I like experimentation. So, for my Master’s dissertation, I went to Avebury with a dodgy microphone and a 360° camera to try and capture a mixture of both archaeology and emotion. I then created a “choose your own adventure” style immersive story using the videos I shot, allowing viewers to pick what kind of anecdote or theme they were interested in experiencing. This was all programmed and downloaded onto a VR headset for a full immersive experience, and tested with dozens of participants.

Some people liked the project, and many others didn’t. That’s the nature of any creative endeavour, and is what makes the whole process exciting. I hope to go back to Avebury soon to reignite that sense of curiosity and create something new, and hopefully, divisive.

If you haven’t visited Avebury, I highly recommend it. In the meantime, if you’d like to experience it virtually, you can watch/play An Avebury Story on YouTube.

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Avebury People

Can you help us to identify the people who made the modern Avebury?

The Alexander Keiller Museum archive holds hundreds of photographs of people. The photographs span several archaeological campaigns across the decades, including excavations run by Harold St George Gray in Avebury Henge in the 1900-10s, and the Alexander Keiller-led work at Avebury and West Kennet Avenue in the 1930s.

As we progress through the project, we hope to identify as many people as we can in these photographs. Our volunteers are busy transcribing captions (when they exist), and collecting names from letters and diaries.

Do you recognise any of these excavators? Perhaps older relatives have photographs that show familiar faces?

Workmen during the 1909 excavations led by Harold St George Gray. Alexander Keiller Museum accession number 78510162.
Workers in 1937 at Avebury. Alexander Keiller Museum accession number 20004218-002.
Workers in 1939, erecting stones in Avebury henge. Alexander Keiller Museum accession number 20004243-002.

The fabulous digitisation volunteer team flag whenever a person is mentioned in letters and diaries. I then compile the names into a list, including details about the person’s role, if known. Later down the line, we hope to be able to match up names with photographs, as we work out who excavated which stone, or who was on site on a given week.

Our working list of ‘Avebury People’ is updated almost daily, but this blog post was last updated 19 February 2024. Check back again as we add new names!

If you recognise any names – especially if you have any photographs – we’d love to hear from you . Leave your comments below to be in touch, or email Fran dot Allfrey at York dot ac dot uk.

Avebury ‘Hands’

During the 1930s excavations at Avebury, the hired workmen were known as ‘hands’ in the diaries and other archive documents. These men lived in the surrounding villages and towns, some travelling quite some way to work. Many of them were agricultural labourers, but some of them returned ‘archaeological worker’ on census records.

SurnameForename(s)Role Further details
AlexanderHandAssisting George Bates 7 Oct 1939
AshA EHand1939, left for RAF Yatesbury job 27 Nov 1939
AshHenryHandHand – 1934, 1935, 1937. Re-excavation of WH 1937 (WEVY 15, 5 Jan). Made Foreman 20 Jul 1938
BallRichard / ‘Turnpike’HandTurnpike’ Ball of Turnpike Cottage. Hand 1937
BallArthur GeorgeHandHand, 1934, 35.
BirdJHand10 Jan 1939, tree-felling under Phil Withal. WEVY diary 22.
BlakeGeorgeHandMentioned in full 7 Jul 1939, 23 Oct 1939 (with Tommy King).Re-excavation of WH 1937 (WEVY 15, 5 Jan)
BlakeHarold JHandHand 1935, 1937 Absent without leave 25 Sep 1937. Re-excavation of WH 1937 (WEVY 15, 5 Jan)
BlakeLionelHand20 Sep 1937 Blake H mentioned 25 Sep 1937. Lionel Blake employed 8 Feb 1937 (WEVY 15) Second carter (haymaking) at WH (WEVY 16 p12) 
BlakeWHand1938: one of 13 men engaged at start of season
BowsherGeorgeHandHand – 1934, 1935. Filling in ‘ganger’ WEVY 9, Jun 7 1934
BrindleWilliam Henry JosephHandHand – 1935. 1937 Entered as Brindel (H) in the diary. Poultry runs, WEVY 12, 24 Oct 1935. Re-excavation of WH 1937 (WEVY 15, 5 Jan)
BuckinghamGeorgeHandHand 1937, 1938 (mistakenly recorded as ‘Buckland’ by NC?
BuckinghamNormanHandLeft 20 Oct 1939 due to call up. Stone Erecting gang member
BullArthur WilliamHandHand – 1934. Hand 1937, 1938
BullBertHandHand – 1935 Experienced wire fencer of Wint Monkton (WEVY 12, 31 Oct) Re-excavation of WH 1937 (WEVY 15, 5 Jan). Excavation gang Avebury (WEVY 16 p19) Hand 1937 Absent without leave 25 Sep 1937 “Turnpike’ [allotments]
BullLewis AdolphusHandHand. 1937 (21 June WEVY16). Carter. Grass cutting . 1939 Register next door to Sam Pratt Wint Monkton. b 29Mar1913
BullWalterHand
ButcherHandHand 1937
CableAlbert / Bert. Initials AH.Hand23 Aug 1937 Cable and Cable (L) mentioned on tasks: Two of this surname. B is given in 1939 diary, and at Re-excavation of WH 1937 (WEVY 15, 5 Jan). 10 Jan1939: Bert Cable on tree felling (WEVY 22).
CableLeonardHandHand – 1934. Hand 1937, 1938, 1939. Employed 8 Feb 1937 (WEVY 15). Tree-felling 10 Jan 1939 (WEVY 22)
ChiversBert (Herbert)HandHand 1937. Excavation gang
DobsonWilliam THandHand 1935, 1937 Erecting gang 1935 W Dobson WEVY diary 22 10 Jan 1939, tree-felling under P Withil
FishlockFrankHandHand – 1934. Hand 1937, assistant to Mr Van Asch (WEVY 16 p20), Foreman 1938
GaleRHandHand – 1934.
GoddardJHandHand – 1934, 1935. Separate to S. Goddard. Erecting gang 1935
GoddardS: H in WEVY diary 9HandHand – 1934. Former Windmill Hill hand. WEVY diary 9 has H Goddard, Apr 10
GriffithsAHandChief assistant to Griffiths, stone erector, from Caernarvon. WEVY 12 Sep 6 1935 
GriffithsG – given as GD in diary, see bio sketchHandGriffiths – ‘drills’ – so D is not part of name. Office of Works foreman WEVY 10 Jun 14 1934 Previously at Stonehenge. Raising stones.
GriffithsWilliamHandGriffiths in charge of stone erecting, with two assistants. From Caernarvon (WEVY 12, 25 Oct 1935)
HambidgeErnest Henry (Hambridge?)HandHand – 1934. Former Windmill Hill hand. Photo in WEVY diary!
HancockGHandDiary 20 p114Jun1938: one of 13 men engaged at start of season
HarperJohnHandHand – 1934.WEVY 9 p157 : John Harper of West Kennet
HeadWHandHand mentioned 21 Nov 1938, 19 Jun and13 Jul 1939. ‘Footman’ living at AM 1939 — CHECK THIS – – where is this info from? 1939 Register, Avebury Manor. W Head,WEVY diary 22, 10 Jan 1939, Hand
Hillier/HillyerHandMentioned September 1938
HorsallHHandApr 9 1934 One of six original ‘Hands’ Same as B Horsell in Keiller diary? ‘Herbert’ otherwise ‘Bert’
HorsellBHandHand – 1934.
Jock Hand1937 – Hand and in charge of concreting gang.
JonesJCHandCarpenter 1939
KingTommy’HandPatrolling site 1 August 1937, working 23 Oct 1939 with George Blake
LanfearWFHandHand – 1934. WEVY 9 has WF Lanfear p157 of Avebury
LiggerHandFirst mentioned with Strange 11 Oct 1937. May not be a Hand.
LoveseySHandHand – 1934. Hand 1937 WEVY 9 has S Lovesey p157 of Wint Monkton. Re-excavation of WH 1937 (WEVY 15, 5 Jan)
LoxtonMHandExcavating with Bert Bull an W Knight 19 Oct 1937. Diary 20 p1 14Jun1938: one of 13 men engaged at start of season
LushJohnHandForeman for Gray – 1909. ‘From Dorchester’
Mathews / MatthewsW / BillHandSpelled 2 ways across diaries
NashBHandHe did two seasons at WH, then 1939 till 27Nov at Avebury. Of Winterbourne Monkton. 
NashAHand1939 diary. Is this person related to or same as A Nash, perhaps? Probably refers to the same person, AE (Bert) Nash.
NashStanleyHandHand 1937 Excavation gang
PearceOHandHand – 1934. Former Windmill Hill hand. Excavation foreman at least 1937-9. Older than W? [‘snr’ in diary is scratched out]. 
PearceWHandHand – 1934. Former Windmill Hill hand. Contracted to Bevan Nov 1935 (WEVY 12)
PrattSamuel HaroldHandHand – 1934,1938 Former Windmill Hill hand. Allotment holder 1935
RadbourneErnestHandHand – 1934. Older brother of Francis
RadbourneFrancisHandHand – 1934. Younger brother of Ernest
RandallFrankHandFirst mention18 Oct 1938
Rathband / RathboneFHandHand – 1934. F Rathband in WEVY diary 9 p91, replaced O Pearce while ill
RogersDonald HandHand 1937, 1938. D Rogers at Re-excavation of WH 1937 (WEVY 15, 5 Jan) Avebury (WEVY 16 p 19)
SalisburyJohn SHandHand, brought from Wales by Mr Griffiths WEVY 10, 18 Jun 1934
SandersonH / ‘Sandy’Hand
StrangeA MHandHand 1937 and Re-excavation of WH 1937 (WEVY 15, 5 Jan)
TuckAHandHand – 1934. Hand 1937(?). Also appears WEVY diart
WhiteHand
WilliamsW.E.HandWEVY diary: 1937 Diary 15 March 8, Jul 9

Staff, Visitors, Correspondents, and more!

The names below have been collected from diaries and letters in the collection. Their roles are varied: some only visited Avebury once, some might have only sent one letter, while others are vital Avebury figures. Each of them occupies a place in the Avebury network, showing how activities here related to archaeological and social goings on further afield. Our volunteers are busy sifting through each name to work out their particular relationship to Avebury.

SurnameForename(s)Role Further details
Acland HoodVisitorVisited 14 Aug 1939 with Gertrude Caton Thompson
AllenVisitorvisitors 14 Jul 1937
AndersonPVisitorListed on ‘Experts visiting site’, 1936, visited 8 Sep 1937
AndersonAvebury localWEVY diary 10, Jul 21 1934. Leased Trusloe Manor to Keiller for 1934 season. With boxing party WEVY 15, 6 Mar 1937. Local person.
ArmstrongJohnVisitorVisitors 25 June 1938, stayed two nights
Ashby RoweMr and MrsVisitorVisitor 27 August 1935
AwdryHasvice[?]VisitorVisited with Colonel Awdrey 28 Sep 1937
AwdryVisitorvisitor 29 Jun, 31 Jul, 28 Sep, 20 Oct 1937; 5 Sep 1938; 11, 28 Sep, 11 Nov 1939
AwdryVisitorVisited with husband, Colonel Awdry and friend 11 Nov 1939
BatesGeorgeSupplier/ ContractorForeman 1937, 1938, 1939 (stone repair specialist)
BathVisitorVisitor 20 Oct 1937 with Col Awdry
BellMrsVisitorVisit July 1935
BellsMrVisitorVisit July 1935, with members of the Southampton Archaeological Society. Also appears WEVY diary.
BensonGuyVisitorWEVY diary 9: May 5 1934, second husband of Lady Violet Benson “of Avebury Manor”
BensonVioletVisitorSeveral visits to site with family, 1934.
BetjemanPenelopeVisitorTravel writer. Wife of poet John Betjeman. Lived at Uffington from 1934. Visitor on site September 1934, stayed at Lawes’s hotel.
BevanSupplier/ Contractor1 Nov 1935. Contracted to lower road banks, with O Pearce, W Pearce, W Dobson recommended to assist. WEVY diary 12.
BeveridgeWilliamVisitorVisit July 1935
BlachHerbertVisitor
Boyd DawkinsVisitorVisit July 1935
BradleyEdwardSupplier/ Contractor1937. Edwin H Bradley and Son, Swindon – photograph of machinery in Album 78510319-020
BradleyEdwinSupplier/ Contractor1937. Discusses plinths with AK 16 Aug 1939
BradleySupplier/ Contractorarranged mechanical excavator 23 Jun 1937
BrailsfordJW (Mr)VisitorList of experts, 1935
Brander “of Kent”VisitorVisitor, April 1934
BrentnallHC VisitorArchaeologist. Visits 1934 and 19 Dec1939, and with wife in 1935 and July 1937(with wife and then Marlborough College boys. Features in 300 album photograph.
BrightJohnVisitor21 Oct 1935 vicar of Ebbesborne, with (driver?) Mr Oborn 
Brooke-PophamsVisitorVisitor, August 13 1935
BrownBellaVisitorVisitor May 14th – May 15th
BushVisitor17 Jun 1937 Archaeologist from Holland, staying with Piggotts
Bushe-Fox JPVisitorVisitor May 3rd, 6th, Jul 12, 1934, 7 Aug 1935. Chief inspector of Ancient Monuments according to 78510467 1934 Diary, name ‘Bushe-Fox’ correct in WEVY Diary no 9 for same dates.
ButlerGVisitor
ButlerPeterVisitorVisitor, 1935
CameVisitorVisitor 13 June 1938, of the News Chronicle
CampkinPercivalConsulted Expert6 Mar 1937. In party watching Boxing in Devizes. Stayed at Manor to examine teeth and jaws from Lanhill and WKA. From London. (Percival Sidney Campkin 1877-1965)
CarterEHVisitorVisitor, April 1934
CarterVisitorVisited 15 Oct 1938
Caton ThompsonGertrudeVisitorArchaeologist, suffragette, Egyptologist, pioneering scientific approach. Visited 14 Aug 1939 with Mrs Acland Hood
ChallestonVisitorDiary notes he is ‘Press’, visits May 1934
Chapman / Keiller / ChalmersDoris EmersonStaffVisitor April 12th – April 19th. Subsequently transferred to staff. Illustrator (1934-5) and part of excavation team (1937-9)
Chief Split and Mrs Chief Split [?!]VisitorVisitors 2 Aug 1939
ChildeVere GordonVisitorVisitor 15 Aug 1938, 30 Aug 1937 with his sister (WEVY 17)
ChittyMiss Lily Francis “Lal”Consulted ExpertPetrologist — 20000593_059, appears in this series
ChiversSupplier/ ContractorMessrs Chivers of Devizes Supplier of a steam roller for drive through Barn Close
CivilKeiller family/friendJun 17 1934. Friend/contact of WEVY. From Gosport
ClarkGrahameVisitorvisitors 30 Jul 1937. Archaeologist (1907-1995) Sir John Grahame Douglas Clarke, FSA, CBE, FBA. Marlborough Coll, Peterhouse Cambridge
ClarkKennethVisitorvisitor 9 Aug 1937 THE Kenneth Clark of ‘Civilisation’ fame. With Sir Phillip Sassoon, by air
ClementsFConsulted ExpertWEVY diary 16, 10, visited by AK et al 25 Jun 1937. Finder of a pot sherd on Overton Ridge. Grandson of Robert Clements, foreman at Silbury and at WH for Dean Merewether, archaeologist, (1779-1850)
Clifton College Archaeological SocietyVisitorVisitors16 June 1938
CoeVisitor28 Feb-1 Mar 1939. Two night stay. Dinner, then Boxing event Swindon Baths, Site visit 1 Mar. MIAR financial discussions 2 Mar.
CollingwoodVisitorVisitors 23 Aug 1937 Archaeologist (Roman specialist)
Colonel Awdrey / AwdryVisitorVisitor 28 August 1935, frequent correspondent
Congreve MVisitor18 May 1937 Visited WH re-excavation with AK. Stayed at Manor. Visitor 3 Aug 1937
Conway Film Company representativesVisitorVisitors 5 Jul 1939, permission to photograph 6 -16 Jul 1939. 22 Jul
CookDavidVisitorVisitor June 1th – June 17th. ‘To see BL’, staying at Perry’s hotel.
CookNormanStaffArchaeologist, supervisor(?) 1938. Address given 1935 diary as “Maidstone Museum, Kent”
CookVisitorVisitor 20 Aug 1938
CookAvebury local10 Oct 1935 Allotment holder
CookWTBC
CooksonVisitorVisitor 21 July 1938
CostinFredStaffMember of Keiller’s permanent staff
Cotswold Field ClubVisitorVisited 17 Aug 1939 
CrawfordOsbert Guy StanhopeVisitorVisited 11 Jul 1934 WEVY diary 10, 23 Jul 1935 WEVY 12.
Cumberland and Westmorland Archaeological SocietyVisitorVisitors 7 Jun 1939, 11am to 5pm. Talks and tours.
CunningtonBenKey character – not Keiller staff etcVisitor 22 Jul,13 Sep 1935
CunningtonMaudKey character – not Keiller staff etcVisitor 22 Jul,13 Sep 1935 WEVY 12, 8 Sep 1937 WEVY 17
CunningtonRobert AnthonyVisitorVisitor, 20 Aug 1937, with father RH Cunnington
CunningtonRobert HenryVisitorWEVY diary 9, Jun 6 1934. Wilts Arch Soc with Cunningtons etc. WEVY diary 17 visitor, 20 Aug 1937 with his son, (Robert A Cunnington), 1 Sep 1937, 8 Sep 1937. Archaeologist. Cousin of Maud Pegge Cunnington and nephew of Ben Cunnington. 
DalglieshWAvebury local10 Feb 1937 winning boxer, Manton Downs Stable lad
DarlingFredAvebury local10 Feb 1937. Racehorse trainer, Beckhampton Stables. Wikipedia
DarlingHVisitorEngineer (constructional). Office of Works, visits 29Jun1934. Wonder if same visitor as Darling (constructional). Also visits 23 Jul 1935 and with wife.
DateMr and DinahVisitorVisit July 1935, Mr Date stayed 28 Sep-2 Oct, 21-24, 29-31 Oct 1938. AK visited him in London several times Sep-Oct 1938
DavidsonJamesVisitorVisitor 29 July 1938
DavidsonMr and MrsVisitorVisitor 20 August 1935
Dayrell ReedTrelawneyVisitorIntermittent correspondent. Artist, author, friend of Augustus John and George Pitt-Rivers, curator of Pitt-Rivers Museum in Farnham Dorest. Visitor May 8 1934 (WEVY 9) with Col Drew and Mr Passmore
de la F[?]MissVisitorVisitor in 1935
DenmanHTVisitorVisitor 23, 31 July, 5 Sep 1935, 25 Aug 1937 (WEVY 17)
DewarWEVY family/friend12 Aug 1937. With nephew and niece. Friends of WEVY
DibbleDLSupplier/ Contractor29 Apr 1937. Painter at Manor, died at Savernake hospital after ulcers operation on 28th Apr.
DittersVisitorVisits in 1935, ‘Ordnance Survey’.
DobsonVisitorVisitor 16 June 1938
DonovanVisitorVisitor 22 Aug 1939 with Father Horne
Drew (and Dorset Field Club)VisitorWith TDR 8 May 1834 (WEVY 9) and Dorset Field Club, 22 Jun 1939, lunched with AK
DruidOther – describe in column N18 Jun 1937. Carthorse owned by AK
DuignanVisitorMet AK at Charles St. 23 May 1939, Prehistoric Society.Visited Avebury 26 May 1939 and stayed overnight
DunbarGeorgeVisitorvisitor 28 Jun to 6 Jul 1937 (WEVY 16) and WH re-excavation 19 May 1937 (WEVY 15) Author of ‘Other Men’s Lives’ a study of primitive peoples (1938)
DuncanKayStaffWindmill Hill supervisor; also appears in letters archive as subject
DunningGCVisitorvisitor 22 Jul 1937 (an archaeologist/med pottery expert). WEVY Diary 19, 18 Jan medieval pottery forwarded for dating. WEVY diary 16, p24 dating medieval pottery
DunningConsulted Expert1937 dating medieval pottery
EarleLionelVisitorVisitor 19 May 1939 from Hilmarton
EarleVisitorVisitors 19 May 1939 from Hilmarton
ElchoVisitorMay 5 1934 (Francis David Charteris 1912-2008) Son of Lady Violet Benson. Visited with Duke of Rutland (her brother, his uncle) and Bensons
EllowayJohn RVisitorJun 17 1934. Friend/contact of WEVY. Co-founder of Basingstoke museum (opened 1931, now rehoused as The Willis Museum) with George Willis. Address 1930: 54 Queens Road, Basingstoke (WEVY diary 1 P20).
Ernest Gordon (Mr and Mrs)VisitorVisitor 28 August 1935
Ethelbert HorneDom VisitorVisitor August 15 1935, 10/11 May 1939
EvansE EstynVisitorVisitor 21 Jul 1939 with Mrs Jones. Stayed in Ebbesbourne about 1927 (WEVY 15, 17 Mar 1937)
Eyres-MonsellJoanVisitorVisitor August 12 1935
FanshaweVisitorQueen’s Boys[?], to apologise for WKA and SE sector damage from troop movements
Fawkes (Fowkes?)RogerVisitor22 April 1939. WEVY friends from 18 years ago.
FensonWVisitorVisitor August 12 1935
Foster ForbesJohnVisitorBroadcast 10 Sep 1937 ‘The Stone Age’
FoxCyrilVisitorWEVY diary 12, 4 & 21 Sep 1935 Archaeologist (1882-1967) Dir, Nat Museum Wales, close friend of Mortimer Wheeler 
FoxHoneyAvebury local
FoyleEnosWEVY family/friend21 Apr 1939. Visit to celebrate WEVY’s parents’ Golden Wedding. Full site visit with AK, DGK and NC
FoyleLilyWEVY family/friend21 Apr 1939. Visit to celebrate WEVY’s parents’ Golden Wedding. Full site visit with AK, DGK and NC
Franks (?)VVisitor
G?Y?Not givenVisitorVisitor July 19th – July 20th and August 25th – August 29th.
Garrons WilliamsSCVisitorVisitor 12 Sep 1939
GeorgeReubenVisitorVisitor, 1935
GilbertCyrilStaffMar 19 1938 “Lad” age 14ish. Working in stores, office & cleaning. 29 Mar, digging flower border in village.
GoddardEHVisitorWEVY diary 9 Visited with Wilts Arch Soc Jun 6 1934, Cunningtons etc
GoddardVisitorUnclear if different to other Goddards? Visitor in 1935, August 10.THIS IS CANON EH GODDARD OF WANHS
GoddardVisitorMrs Goddard visits with friends, 1935, August 10. Link to other Goddards?
GraemeVisitorvisitor 23 Aug 1937
Grant KingDenisStaffSee also ‘Denis Grant Price’, attached to staff 19 Aug 1938?
Grau (spelling?)Not givenVisitorVisitor May 14th – May 15th. Entered as Fraûline G.
GrayFlorenceKey character – not Keiller staff etc
GrayHarold St GeorgeKey character – not Keiller staff etc
GraysonMrsVisitor
GreaderWAvebury local20 May 1937 Landowner selling part of Plough Barrow to AK
GreenwoodVisitorVisited 16 Aug 1939. 9th Lancers, involved in Army exercises, with Lewin [?]
GreigKeiller family/friend5 Apr 1937. AK’s Uncle. Visited WH re-excavation with AK
GreigKeiller family/friend5 Apr 1937. AK’s Aunt. Visited WH re-excavation with AK
GreigKeiller family/friend5 Apr 1937. AK’s cousin? Visited WH re-excavation with AK
GwynneMrsVisitorVisitor August 1934, stayed at Red Lion, stayed Trusloe Manor
HaldenJSupplier/ ContractorFeb 22 1938 arrows and pickets sent for enamelling and repair 73B Victoria St, London SW1, returned Mar 22, more sent Mar29
HaleOther – describe in column N16 Apr 1937.Boxer. Welterweight champ 4th Hussars. 
HartJOther – describe in column N10 Feb 1937 losing boxer, Beckhampton Stable lad
HatherelAvebury local8 Oct 1935 Allotment holder
HawkesChristopherVisitor12 Apr 1937. Archaeologist. Visited WH re-excavation with AK. WEVY 22 p70 24 Apr 1939 overnight stay 
HawkesJacquettaVisitor12 Apr 1937. Archaeologist. Visited WH re-excavation with AK. 24 Apr 1939 overnight stay 
HawleyWilliamVisitorMay 14 1934. (Wm Hawley 1851-1941) Archaeologist, Stonehenge 1890s, Pokesdown 1926
HeasmanVisitorListed on ‘Experts visiting site’, 1934 Office of Works WEVY 9, Jun 3 1934, WEVY 17, 22 Aug 1937
HeathAvebury local1937 local landowner and farmer. Owner of ‘Crawford’s Circle”
Heathicote[?]Visitorvisitor 9 Aug 1937, staying for a week
HebdonStaff6 Mar 1937. In Devizes Boxing trip. WH with AK etc (WEVY 16 p13)
HempWJ and MrsVisitorVisitor, August 13 1935, 23 Aug 1937
HendersonWinifredKeiller family/friendVisitor, 1935. Friend of Keiller, introduced him to Antonia White (Linda Murray, Zest for Life)
Henman [?]Visitorvisitor 21 Aug 1937, stayed for lunch
Hobden / HebdenNot givenVisitorVisitor July 16th – July 17th. Entered as Miss Hobden.
HoggAHAVisitorVisitor 20 August 1935
HollowayTeddyStaff24 Apr 1937 Avebury schoolboy assisting WEVY in MAIR
HolmesMissVisitor
HolmesVisitorHolmeses hoe-ed by DGK 5 May 1939
HorneEthelbertVisitorVisitor 15 Aug 1935, 22 Aug 1939 with Father Donovan, 26 Sep 1935 with Fr Moody. Downside Abbey. Archaeologist and RC Prior Downside Abbey, Somerset
HTD [?]VisitorVisits with friends, 1935. WEVY 17 p28 Mr J Hunt letter 18.1.28 on C16th key.
HuntJohnVisitorVisitor 6 July 1938.
HuntJohnVisitorVisitors 21 Sep and 29 Oct 1938, 18 Nov 1939 
Huth[?]Visitorvisitor 29 Jun 1937
JacksonJ WilfredConsulted ExpertJan 15 1938 animal bones forward to him for exam and report
JacksonJohn WilfredConsulted ExpertOsteoarchaeologist (1880-1978), Manchester based Bones identified as young fox
JamesMarjorieStaffExcavation team 1934-5
JarmanHStaffMar 5 1938 new garage assistant to Phil Withil. WEVY diary 22, p40, p42 Feb 1939. AK’s driver, of the Marshall (car)
JennerLeoVisitor
JenningsVisitorVisited with Mr Date 15 Oct – 17 Oct 1938
JohnsonVisitorVisits with a friend, April 1934
JohnstonIsobelStaffStaff in 1935 – wonder if this is the same person who visits in 1934 (although note differently spelled name). Address in 1935 diary given Balgillo Crescent, Broughty Ferry, Dundee
JonesVisitorVisitor 21 Jul 1939 from Kilmundie[?] with Evans
KeillerAlexanderStaff
KennardASConsulted Expert
KnightThomas
KnightWVisitor1939
LaidlerBarbaraStaffExcavation team 1934-5
LaurenceVisitorvisitor 12 Jul 1937 with his architect
LawesHenryAvebury localField owner (1939) 
LawsonJoseph ‘Joe’Avebury local10 Feb 1937. Racehorse trainer, Manton Downs. Wikipedia
LeaskVisitorvisitor 23 Aug 1937
Lewin [?]VisitorVisited 16 Aug 1939 after ‘Army scandal’ [exercises on WKA] with Greenwood
LiddellDorothyVisitorVisitor April 30th – May 2nd. Windmill Hill supervisor who carried out pioneering work on the decoration of prehistoric pottery. IS THIS SAME AS DML?
LiddellVeronicaStaffWindmill Hill supervisor. Married Keiller
Ligh [?]VisitorVisitors 3 June 1939
LittlecottAvebury localMar 8 1938 previous occupants of (uninhabitable) Old Forge cottage, High St, Avebury, now owned and demolished by AK. Once lodged in by WEVY
LordWilfredVisitorvisitor 12 Jul 1937
LowtherAWGVisitorvisitor 26 Aug, 8 Sep 1937, 13 Jul 1939
MabyConsulted ExpertJan 17 1938 soil and charcoal samples forwarded 
MagorGillian Ione MaudStaff14 Jan 1939. With fiance Thurstan Shaw – WEVY’s friends
MahrVisitorMet AK at Charles St. 17and 23 May 1939, Prehistoric Society Council Meeting
MaidmentEllenVisitorWEVY’a aunt. Visitor, 22 Aug 1937, with daughters Barbara and Connie, WEVY’s cousins
MairVisitorVisit July 1935
MartinEricVisitorVisitor 1934 and 1935
MassinghamMr and Mrs (and hound)VisitorVisitors 25 Jul 1935. Author of ‘Downland Man’ WEVY 12 
MathesonVisitorvisits: 29 June 1937 Mr Matheson of National Trust. With wife 21 Aug 1937
MattisonVisitorvisitor 29 Jun 1937
McPhailVisitorVisitors 14 Aug 1938
Megalith SocietyVisitorNine members visited afternoon of Sunday 13 Nov 1938
MonteithVisitorVisitors 18 June 1938, stayed overnight at Avebury Manor
MontiethCynthiaVisitorVisitor 1-2 Jul 1939, with R Montieth
MontiethRonaldVisitorVisitor 30 Jun – 2 Jul 1939
MoodyVisitor26 Sep 1935 with Very Rev Prior Horne
MooreJSHVisitor
MorrisMayVisitor
MorrisVisitor2 Jun 1937, WH. With WEVY’s friend Canon O’Farrell
Mr and Mrs BennetMr and MrsVisitorVisitor August 15 1935
Mr Keiller’s cousinsVisitorMay 15 1934 CHECK with Keiller diary
NashPaulVisitorVisitor 28 June 1938. Important war artist WW2. Well documented
NeilsonVisitorVisitor 28 June 1938 same day as Paul Nash
NewallRobert SterlingVisitorVisits with Uncle, July 1935. Archaeologist and collector (1884-1974) 
Newbigin / Newbiggin“Nancy”VisitorArchaeologist, particularly noted for worked on rock art and Celtic sites in Ireland. Full name Agnes Jane Waugh Newbigin
Newbury Field ClubVisitorVisitors 20 July 1938
NichollsVisitor1939 – which source?
Nicol / NicholVisitorWEVY Diary Aug 30 1934 page 119
NormanGraceVisitorVisitor in 1935 – 2 July
NormanMiss EVisitorVisitor in 1935 – 4 July Archaeologist, assisted Dorothy Liddell at Hembury Fort (and so knew WEVY)
NorringtonAPVisitorVisitor 1 Jul 1939
O’FarrellVisitorJun 1937, WH. From Aldershot. Friend of WEVY with Fr Morris
O’NeilB.H.StJ.VisitorVisitor September 5th – September 6th, stayed at Perry’s
ObornVisitor2 Oct 1935 some time motor bus driver from Ebbesbourne, with Rev and Mrs Bright. (WEVY 12 20 Nov 1935)
Ormsby GoreVisitorThe ‘First Commissioner of Works’, Office of Works, visits in 1934, 14 Aug 1935
Ottley [?]FHBVisitorVisitor August 12 1935
ParadiseDouglasAvebury localVillager. Blacksmith, owner of “Goatacre” 1 Sep 1938. Paradise’s Cottage demolished in 1938 by MIAR
ParrishColonel and MrsVisitorVisit in 1935
ParsonsLouisConsulted ExpertListed on ‘Experts visiting site’, Visitor June 28th – June 29th, 1934, stayed at Perry’s hotel. Plaster casts of stone fractures to be repaired.
PassmoreVisitorMay 8 1934, with Col Drew and TDR 
Peak-Garland?Avebury localManor Farm, landowner
Peak-GarlandAvebury local
PeakeHaroldVisitorVisits with two friends, April 1934. Well known – has ADS record?
PerryCDAvebury localFeb 15 1938 Owner, Avebury Private Hotel (“Perry’s”)
PerryAvebury localJun 17 1934. Proprietor of Perry’s Private Hotel, Avebury
PetoVisitorVisited and lunched with AK 17 Aug 1939. 9th Lancers, with Thornton re army scandal
PhilipsCWVisitorVisitor 5 Sep1935, 31 Oct 1939, stayed with Piggots 22 Jun 1937 (WEVY 16 p21) 
PiggottPeggyVisitorVisitor 25 June to 5 Jul 1937
PiggottStuartStaffArchaeologist
Plante/PlantGVisitorExpert plasterer employed by Messrs Turner, Lord and Co., London.Discussion to take plaster casts 21 Sep 1937. Plastering 28 Sep 1937 and casts September 1938, 22 Jul1939
PriceVisitorVisits May 1934
PricterAvebury local12,14 Oct 1935 Allotment holder
PritchardVisitorVisitors 3 June 1939
PughVisitorJun 6 1934. Wilts Arch Soc with Cunningtons etc
PugsleyJosephSupplier/ ContractorHeavy machinery hire – photograph 78510319-019
RabyFJEVisitorOffice of Works. Visitor 26 Aug 1935, 16 Aug 1937 – stayed at Manor (WEVY 17). Frequent correspondent of AK.
RadcliffeRAvebury localTenant. Inside repairs to her cottage on Swindon Road 30 Nov 1939 by GB
RadfordRalegh CAVisitor22 Aug 1935 Archaeologist (1900-1998)FSA with van Giffen
RaffertyVisitorMet AK at Charles St. 23 May 1939, Prehistoric Society. Visited Avebury 26 May 1939 and stayed overnight
RawlinsFrankAvebury localVillager- Garage owner. Drove WEVY to Guildford (WEVY 15, 22 Feb 1937) Worked in Manor garage till 26 Feb 1937 
ReedOther – describe in column NMar 12 1938 AK presented bravery award to 13 year old Reed at Netheravon boys boxing contests
Reginald WilliamsonMrsVisitorVisit July 1935
RickardsMargeryStaffWEVY diary 16 one of two garage assistants MIAR, wages clerk from 26 June 1937
RobertsVisitorvisitor 14 Jul 1937
RumboldAnthonyVisitorVisitor, August 13 1935
RutlandVisitorMay 5 1934 (JHM Manners 1888-1940) Brother of Lady Violet Benson. Visited with Lord Elcho (his nephew) and Bensons. 
S [?]RobertVisitorVisitors 10 Sep 1938
SassoonPhilipVisitorvisitor 9 Aug 1937 with Kenneth Clark, arrived by air. First Commissioner of Works in 1937. Under Secretary of State for Air, managing RAF
SewellVisitor4 May 1937. Visited WH re-excavation. Friend of DC???
ShawCharles ThurstanConsulted ExpertVisitor 30 April 1934, (WEVY 9), August 19 1935 to 23 Aug 1935 excavating (WEVY 12). Visited: NW Sector 12 Jul 1937(WEVY 16), SW sector with WEVY (diary 22) 14 Jan 1939 with fiancee Ione Magor.
Simking [?]LanceVisitorVisitor 18 Sep 1939
SimpsonFJOther – describe in column N16 Apr 1937. Boxer. Amateur lightweight champion GB 1936
SirlVisitorWEVY diary 10, Jul 19 1934. Of Ebbesbourne Wake, lodger at WEVY’s parental home (WEVY diary 13 p16), visited with Mr Street,
SmithAlanVisitorVisited site with Date and Miss Jennings 16 Oct, and 17 Oct , 22-24,29 Oct 1938. Stayed overnight 7 Jun 1939
SmithIsobelKey character – not Keiller staff etcPioneering prehistorian. Excavated at Avebury and published a synthesis of the Keiller excavations in 1965
SmithJanetVisitorVisitor May 14th – May 15th
SmithKCVisitorList of visitors to Avebury, April 1934, staying at Perry’s Hotel
SmithNot given – separate to JanetVisitorVisitor May 14th – May 15th. Entered as ‘Miss Smith’, separate to Janet Smith.
SmithVisitorVisitor to Manor 28 Aug 1938
SmithVisitorAug 4 1935. Family friends of WEVY
SoulMr Soul (of Amesbury)VisitorVisitor 20 August 1935
SpainPVisitorJul 7 1935. Sidney Sussex College, Camb pal with Thurstan Shaw
SpenceHegmatKeiller family/friend1939 diary. Ski-ing friend of AK since 1920s, mentioned alongside Guy Nixon, Chris Mackintosh and Colin Wyatt
StephensonVisitorVisitor 20 Oct 1937 with Col Awdry
StoneJFSVisitorArchaeologist. Corresponded with Young, see folder, 20000593 WEVY diary 9. Visitor Jun 6 1934 with Wilts Arch Soc and Cunningtons. see Wikipedia
StrappsAnnie AlbertinaWEVY family/friendWEVY’s aunt. Visitor 19 Aug 1937. With WEVY’s parents. Chauffeur driven by Vickers, at AK’s invitation
StreetVisitorJul 19 1934. Of Ebbesbourne Wake WEVY’s friend, with Miss Sirl
SturdeyBernardStaffStaff 1934, visits 23 Jul 1935
SymingtonJVisitorVisitor with Date and A Smith 22-24, 29 Oct 1938. Scottish Geologist?
TVisitorVisitor 25 June 1937
TaylorAvebury localHosted listening of recording of J Foster-Forbes’s broadcast 17/22 Sep 1937
Taylor / TaylourSorelStaff10 Sep 1939 Section-Leader ATS [Auxilliary Territorial Service] (1939 diary)
TeischlerHansVisitorvisitor 30 Jul 1937. 
ThorneycroftMr and MrsVisitorVisit 9 July 1935
ThorntonVisitorVisited and lunched with AK 17 Aug 1939 with Peto re army scandal
Thurloe LeedsEVisitorVisitor August 15 1935
TibbleAvebury localJun 18 1934. Nursed R Gale (Hand) who died that morning
TitcombeGeorgeAvebury localAppears WEVY diary 10. Also WEVY diary 12, 24 Oct 1935, measuring for a fence up to the Toll House
Tom of the Grab’Tom DAMON? Supplier/ ContractorGrab operative 26 Sep 1938. WEVY 20 see queries.
Van Asch [?]VisitorFrom New Zealand (WEVY 16 p 20)Blasting tree stumps July 1937, finished 19 July. Visited 13 Oct 1939 with wife
van GiffenAlbert EggesVisitor22 Aug 1935 Dutch Archaeologist (1884-1973) with Radford
VatcherFaith Other – describe in column NCurator of the Alexander Keiller Museum. Excavated Avebury in 1969 and 1976
VatcherLanceOther – describe in column N
VawlettVisitor
VickersWAvebury local1 Mar 1937. A Mechanic? Replaced F Rawlins in Manor garage.
VickersWalterStaffWEVY 16, 3 Aug 1937 assistant chauffeur at Manor. WEVY 19, Mar 5 1938 now ‘ex’ garage assistant to Phil Withil
VigorVisitorMr (Captain) and Mrs Vigor visit twice April 1934, Mrs Vigor and Miss Vigor also visit. Visit again in 1935. East Kennett Manor
Violet PakenhamVisitorSpelling uncertain. Visitor, August 13 1935
ViveashRoseVisitorMiss Vyvash in diary. Visitor, 1934
W G S VisitorWiltshire Geological Society visit (220 members)
Wagstaffe (perhaps a misspelling? Think this is Barbara WagstaffVisitorAppears as visitor in 1935 – visits on same date as Miss Piggott. Note that Wagstaff later takes photographs at Sutton Hoo (1939), at which the Piggots excavate. Very significant if she also is at Avebury.
WallisVisitorvisitor 20 Aug 1937
WallisVisitorJun 29 1934, landowner, of Cherhill, colleague of Mr Wright, WEVY’s friend
WaltersVisitorA descendent of Dr William Stukeley, visits 28 August 1935
WatsonWSVisitorvisitor 3 Jul 1937, staying at the Manor [Avebury]
WheelerMortimerConsulted Expert
WhiteFAvebury localTenant. Inside repairs to her cottage on Swindon Road 30 Nov 1939 by GB
WildeJimmyOther – describe in column NReferee, 9 Feb 1937. Famous and controversial Welsh boxer (active 1911-23) Wikipedia. Local training stables competition boxing referee with AK in Marlborough.
WilderPhyllisStaff
WilliamsLetticeVisitorVisitor 4 Aug 1938
WilliamsPVisitorVisitor 4 Aug 1938
WilliamsOther – describe in column NAppears in undated photographs from Denis Grant King
Williams-FreemanVisitorJun 6 1934. Wilts Arch Soc with Cunningtons etc, 20 Oct 1937
WillisGeorge WVisitorJun 17 1934. Friend/contact of WEVY. Co-founder of original Basingstoke museum (opened 1931, now rehoused as The Willis Museum) with John R Elloway. Clockmaker and jeweller at 2 Wote Street, Basingstoke. (WEVY 1, P19). Mayor of Basingstoke 1923-4
WilsonVisitorVisitor and ‘Medicine Office of Health’, 1934
WithilPhilStaffMember of Keiller’s permanent staff. Chauffeur. PHOTO WEVY 19 p44
WoolleyLeonardVisitorvisitor 22 Aug 1937, 14Aug1938 Famous archaeologist, Ur, Mesopotam
WoolleyVisitorvisitor 22 Aug 1937 with husband, above
WrightVisitorJun 29 1934 School Inspector, friend of WEVY. With Mr Wallis
YoungAmyVisitorWEVY’s sister-in-law. 19 Sep 1937 with husband Bert and WEVY’s mother
YoungBertramVisitorWEVY’s brother. 19 Sep 1937 with wife Amy and WEVY”s mother
YoungEdward TomWEVY family/friend21 Apr 1939. Visit to celebrate WEVY’s parents’ Golden Wedding. Full site visit with AK, DGK and NC. WEVY 17 day visit 19 Aug 1937, chauffeur driven by Vickers, at AK’s invitation
YoungFannyWEVY family/friend21 Apr 1939. Visit to celebrate WEVY’s parents’ Golden Wedding. Full site visit with AK, DGK and NC. WEVY 17 day visit 19 Aug 1937, chauffeur driven by Vickers, at AK’s invitation. Visit 19 Sep 1937 with Bert and Amy.
YoungWilliamStaffSite Foreman. Many sources!
Zennor / ZennerFConsulted ExpertJan 17 1938 soil and charcoal samples forwarded